Arkansas Lawmakers Introduce Resolution Recognizing Marshall Islands Connection With U.S.

edited February 14 in General
WASHINGTON, DC (KFSM) — On Wednesday (Feb. 13) U.S. Senators John Boozman, Tom Cotton, and Congressman Steve Womack introduced a resolution recognizing the strategic importance of the Republic of the Marshall Islands and the Marshallese people who live in the U.S.

Sen. Boozman said, “This resolution acknowledges the unique partnership our country has with the Republic of the Marshall Islands and the need for this support to continue. To better meet their needs it is necessary to better understand and account for this population calling the U.S. home, making the 2020 census crucial to this goal,” says Sen. Boozman

The largest concentration of Marshallese people living in the U.S. is in Springdale, Arkansas.

Since the 1980s, when the Marshall Islands became a sovereign state with the U.S. under the Compact of Free Association (COFA) in 1986, thousands of Marshallese have legally migrated to North America. The COFA is up for renewal in 2023.

The 2010 census estimated 4,324 out of the 22,400 Marshallese individuals living in the U.S. resided in Arkansas. The population in 2019 is expected to be between 8,000 to 14,000.

The lawmakers say the 2020 census is important for the Marshallese people residing in the U.S. to better serve them and the cities they live in.

“The large Marshallese community in Northwest Arkansas is a constant reminder of the close relationship our nation shares with the Republic of the Marshall Islands. Just as the people of Arkansas and our Marshallese neighbors continue to strengthen their friendships, so the United States ought to continue bolstering its own relations with their home republic,” Arkansas Sen. Tom Cotton said.

“The Marshallese in Springdale and across Arkansas enrich our state. This resolution highlights the contributions of the Marshallese and the important relationship we have built and shared as a community,” Congressman Steve Womack said.

In addition to its embassy in Washington, D.C., the Republic of the Marshall Islands also has a consulate in Springdale. The largest populations of Marshallese residing in the U.S. today live in Arkansas and Hawaii.
https://5newsonline.com/2019/02/13/arkansas-lawmakers-introduce-resolution-recognizing-marshall-islands-connection-with-u-s/

“The large Marshallese community in Northwest Arkansas is a constant reminder of the close relationship our nation shares with the Republic of the Marshall Islands. Just as the people of Arkansas and our Marshallese neighbors continue to strengthen their friendships, so the United States ought to continue bolstering its own relations with their home republic. This resolution celebrates the bond our countries share and the need for our two nations to keep working together,” Cotton said.

“The Marshallese in Springdale and across Arkansas enrich our state. This resolution highlights the contributions of the Marshallese and the important relationship we have built and shared as a community. With the 2020 Census approaching, as well as the Compact of Free Association up for renewal in 2023, it is also critical that we accurately account for the Marshallese residing in the U.S. to better serve them and the cities they live in,” Womack said.

The U.S. has a unique relationship with the Marshall Islands. In the aftermath of World War II, the Marshall Islands was a U.S.-administered United Nations Trust Territory. In 1986, the Marshall Islands entered into a Compact of Free Association (COFA) with the U.S. and became a sovereign, “freely associated” state. Under the COFA, the U.S. is obligated to defend the Republic of the Marshall Islands against attack or threat of attack. The U.S. also maintains unique military basing rights in the Marshall Islands that extend through at least 2066. The security and sovereignty of the Marshall Islands is important to our country and to the thousands of Marshallese who have planted roots in Arkansas. The COFA agreement is up for renewal in 2023.

Since the 1980s, thousands of Marshallese have legally migrated to the United States. The 2010 census estimated 4,324 out of the 22,400 Marshallese individuals living in the U.S. resided in Arkansas. However, that population is actually estimated to be between 8,000 to 14,000. In addition to its embassy in Washington, D.C., the Republic of the Marshall Islands also has a consulate in Springdale.

The resolution has the support of the entire Arkansas Congressional delegation. The largest populations of Marshallese residing in the U.S. today live in Arkansas and Hawaii
https://www.boozman.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/2019/2/arkansas-lawmakers-introduce-resolution-to-recognize-the-marshallese

Comments

  • Wow. I salute the people of the RMI. Not only are they the leading voice on the global world stage against the fight against climate change but are also leading the fight to get recognition on the importance of the COFA. Wish us folks here in the Carolines islands from FSM to Palau would do the same since the COFA is viewed negatively in Guam and Hawaii. We from FSM and Palau must contribute too. With this the RMI no doubt has secured its COFA for the next 100 years if ever they try to renegotiate it in 3 years.
  • Yes. All 3 COFA nations should be involved with promiting the COFA and showing those who doubt the importance the of the COFA. What is FSM going to do when 2023 renewals negotiation arrive?
  • I believe RMI and Palau got their renewals deal already in the bag. Palau will be used in the future to counter China's move in the South china sea. RMI's missile range in Kwaj and its high % of military recruits will play its parts along with the memory of the bikinis testings in their COFA renewal ploy.
  • Pohnpei students meet with FSM president, vice president
    15 Feb 2019 PALIKIR, Pohnpei (FSM Information Services)

    Every year the public high schools in Pohnpei State in the Federated States of Micronesia have Career Exploration Week, and on Monday, Feb. 11, 2019, the 12th grade students from Pohnpei Island Central School visited the Palikir Capitol Complex.

    The thirteen groups of seniors each visited three separate agencies and offices. Peter M. Christian, president of the FSM, met with two groups in the morning while Yosiwo P. George, vice president of the FSM, met with one group in the afternoon.

    Each group of seniors had multiple students keen on knowing the answer to one of the biggest and most important questions facing the FSM:

    “What happens after 2023?”


    “What do we do when 2023 comes?”

    “What’s the FSM’s plan after 2023?”

    “Will we be okay after 2023?”

    “We’ll survive,” said President Christian to the first group. The President emphasized that the FSM’s relationship with the United States doesn’t go away after 2023 and that, while much of the economic assistance we presently rely upon will be going away, not all of it will.

    We have two trust funds to sustain us, some economic assistance will still be given (primarily for the health and education sectors), and external assistance — from international organizations like the World Bank and Asian Development Bank, and other countries like the People’s Republic of China and Japan — is pouring in.

    “We can be appreciative of the Chinese, who are building roads in Madolenihmw and the Kahmar Bridge,” said the President, “and we can be appreciative of the Japanese who are extending our airport here in Pohnpei.”

    The President also alluded to the fact that we may simply need to cut certain government expenses in order to keep essential services active — but, far more importantly, we’ll also need to genuinely come together as a community to take ownership of our lives and our situations.

    “Look at PICS,” President Christian said, “not just as a government-funded school — look at it as our school. Ownership is crucial. If the grass needs to be cut, we can all come together and cut it.”

    Vice President George echoed President Christian’s remarks that we must be one, that unity is not merely a platitude but sincerely our way forward as an independent, sovereign nation. “There’s no doubt that 2023 is a big question, and an important question, and I’m so glad that you asked about it, that you’re thinking about it,” said Vice President George. “We all need to work together.”

    One student asked Vice President George to clarify what he meant — what does working together look like, after all, if we’re students about to graduate from high school, and many of us are planning to study in Hawaii, Guam, or the United States mainland?

    Vice President George said “You are not just a citizen from Pohnpei — you are a Micronesian. We are all citizens of the FSM. This country is your country; this capital is your capital. So this country, your country, relies on you to study hard, outside of the FSM if you need to, but then to come back.”

    Vice President George emphasized that each person and their individual commitment makes a difference, and for every citizen who chooses to lend their skills and talents elsewhere means the FSM then lacks those skills and talents. This paralleled what President Christian told the second group, when he said “When we say the FSM is beautiful, it’s not just the islands — the waterfalls, the trees, the mountains. It’s the people. It’s you. It’s us.”

    One student asked President Christian about getting government jobs. President Christian noted, as he has throughout his career in public service, that there is nobility in helping family and community by working — and that there is nobility in public service. But, “It’s not the job of the government to get you a job — it’s our job to make an environment that allows opportunity for you to find a job, or to make your own job,” said President Christian.

    Several students asked what else, besides 2023, the FSM is struggling with. Both President Christian and Vice President George discussed economic development, the need for foreign investment, and the threat of climate change.

    “Even though some economic aid will go away, the Compact of Free Association won’t disappear,” Vice President George told the afternoon group. “Though we may need to cut some expenses, we remain committed to an independent, free FSM.”

    After the formal visits, one particularly outgoing student spoke with FSM Information Services directly. When asked what she thought about the answers to the questions about 2023, the student — who didn’t wish to be named —said, “I think it’s like me. I don’t know what will happen when I go to college and leave my family, like FSM doesn’t know what will happen in 2023. But if I work hard to make my better future, and we all work hard to make better future, we’ll have that future we’re looking for.”

    http://www.mvariety.com/regional-news/110688-pohnpei-students-meet-with-fsm-president-vice-president
  • Keep socialism ideals out of Micronesia and liberalism and that dependency mentality and FSM will be good.
  • Yes, we know there is no "dependency mentality" in the FSM since we do not accept money or any other assistance from the U.S., China, Japan, Australia, or any other country.

    The FSM is happily independent.

    HAHAHAHAHAHA Thanks for the laugh, PS.
  • The dependency mentality im talking about is the one you Democrats want and are enforcing on colored people like welfare and expecting everything for free. This we don't need in Micronesia. It has destroyed the African American people has a race and we must not happen in FSM or Micronesia.
  • Another Topic hijacked by Trump derangement syndrom. tsk tsk tsk tsk
  • Welfare is how the Democrats enalved blacks after republicans freed them.
  • These are important symbolic resolutions that should easily pass both chambers no matter which party is in control. Similar efforts last year failed to make traction in both chambers.

    Such efforts are being worked at the state level..Hawaii, Oregon, Arkansas, Washinton, n Texas account for the Majority of COFA citizens residing in the U.S. 50 states.
  • what similar efforts you 're talking about last year? . just wondering..
  • Visafree, similar resolution introduced by Arkansas Rep n Senate..both didnt get much further.
  • would you mind share that resolution and what is all about?
  • What are fsmers doing? Besides sitting on the sideline? we must also do the same thing and join our brothers and sisters from the Marshalls. Because in the end it will benifit us. This law mentioned above names only the marshallese and rmi.
  • Rasta...not everyone doing COFA work is out in the open bro. All 3 COFA nations are collaborating closely on various levels..probably more so these days than ever.

    FSM initiated the Real ID effort..all 3 FAS later joined in the effort.

    Join the effort..not shame others.
  • Yes all 3 worked but from the looks of it from both laws being considered and laws signed look like the RMI was the reason it passed. The Marshalls were singled out in both laws in writings namely what the US did in Bikini.
  • Let our bros and sis from the RMI get all the credits they deserve. Not disputing their due diligence. I know their work first hand. You Ananuki..care to join us.? lol carry on dude
  • Everybody all win so everybody chill.
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